Promising results after one week

You may recall the mosquito and all that followed from that.

I don’t think I’ve mentioned that I heard footsteps a couple weeks ago—footsteps on the ceiling above my office on the second floor. And these footsteps were the light and scampering type. “Rats,” I thought, as soon as I heard them. So the kitten at the ground floor kitchen had perhaps scared the rats away to the roof? That’s good as it concerns the kitchen, but the scampering noises over my head while I work are not quite what I wanted.

That’s when I decided to go ahead and give the rat glue a try. We set out a tray, upstairs, beside the wall, baited with dried shrimp which I’ve been informed is a favorite food of rats in southern Thailand.

Then, we waited.

rat glue tray with dried shrimp bait

No rat took the bait, so after a few days I moved the glue tray to another location. Now, after more than a week, I’m happy to share this photo and report that the dried shrimp remain on the glue tray, that no footprints are noticeable on the glue, and that no geckos were caught by this contraption.

I’d like to say that the rats have decided this is too difficult a place to stay, what with the geckos and the kitten and now the glue trap.

Or maybe they just don’t like dried shrimp. I hope this story is over, but if it isn’t, you’ll be able to read about it here.

Micah Woods
Micah Woods

Scientist, author, consultant, and founder of the Asian Turfgrass Center

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